News & Resources

AAREA launches the Membership Program!


AAREA® News & Information – Fall 2015

AAREA extends a heart-felt thank you to all that supported the pilot effort of the STEM STEPS for Success program. In a very short 6-month period, we scaled quickly and served nearly 200 Alameda County African American students and their families through our Saturday and summer initiatives! Read more

Press Release: 300 African Americans on the campus of Mills College for the STEM STEPS for Success Project

The African American Regional Educational Alliances (AAREA), in partnership with the Investing in Innovation STEM Learning Opportunities Providing Equity Project (I3 SLOPE Project), Mills College School of Education, and 8 Bay Area school districts (Castro Valley Unified, Hayward Unified, Livermore Valley Joint Unified, New Haven Unified, Oakland Unified, Pleasanton Unified, San Leandro Unified and San Lorenzo Unified) kicked off the new STEM Strategies to Empower and Prepare Students for Success (STEM S.T.E.P.S. for Success) at Mills College with over 300 African American students and parents in attendance. Read more

STEM Sponsorship Drive

AAREA is raising funds to provide scholarships to children participating in STEM and college awareness programming through the STEM STEPS for Success Project. This project aims to enhance the STEM success and college eligibility rates of African American students in Alameda County through youth development, family enrichment, and professional development opportunities. Read more

STEM STEPS 4.0

Become a STEM STEPS 4.0 Family Today! Opportunities in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math are abound! African Americans MUST be positioned to take advantage of them! Read more

AAREA® 8th Annual Professional Development Summit

Celebrating and Cultivating a Brilliant, Resilient, and Strong Educational Community: A Professional Development Summit on the Status of African American Education.
Join us as we connect, learn, and expand our thinking about how we can support African American students succeed on their path to college and beyond! Read more

AAREA® News & Information – Fall 2015

AAREA extends a heart-felt thank you to all that supported the pilot effort of the STEM STEPS for Success program. In a very short 6-month period, we scaled quickly and served nearly 200 Alameda County African American students and their families through our Saturday and summer initiatives! Read more

AAREA® Newsletter October 2014

AAREA Launches the STEM STEPS for Success Project
According to Ed Trust in the "State of Education for African American Students":
- Only about one-third African American students are likely to be proficient or advanced in reading and math
- Only 1 in 20 African American graduates meet all four college-readiness benchmarks
AAREA is launching the STEM Strategies to Empower and Prepare Students for Success Project (STEM STEPS for Success), a pilot project aimed at addressing these alarming statistics as well as enhancing the STEM success and college eligibility rates of African American students in Alameda County. Read more

AAREA® Newsletter March 2014

In this issue: Celebrating a Living Legend: Bobbie Brooks, co-founder of the African American Regional Educational Alliances; Educational Pioneers: the 5th Annual Professional Development Breakfast; SuperSATurday Family College Day, Partner in the Spotlight: Hayward Unified School District and the African American Student Achievement Initiative; Community Calendar, Celebrating Student Brilliance: the 10th Annual African American Student Achievement & Excellence Awards on Saturday, April 19th Read more

Video: 9th Annual African American Student Achievement and Excellence Awards

Check out this fantastic short video about one of our signature programs, the African American Student Achievement and Excellence Awards. Read more

AAREA® Newsletter January – February 2014

In celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King's birthday, AAREA hosted the screening of the movie American Promise at Century Theatres in Hayward. The event sold out twice leading to a packed house of 130 participants. Following the movie was a rich discussion... Read more

AAREA® Newsletter October 2013

AAREA™ wants to officially welcome you to the 2013-2014 academic year. We have been busy preparing for the many exciting growth opportunities coming to AAREA™ this year and are looking forward to 2013-2014. It is guaranteed to be a fulfilling year packed with many surprises. Read more

October 10-12 in Chicago: A Black Education Congress – Reclaiming and Celebrating What Works – Passing The Torch

A Black Education Congress (ABEC) represents the vision of a network of Black educators and activists in the United States, Canada and the Caribbean. Our intention is to give explicit attention to inter-generational collaboration to elevate and celebrate "what works" for children of African ancestry in educational settings and to "pass the torch" to those coming on behind us. Read more

AAREA® Addresses the Systematic Demise of Black Boys on January 26th in Oakland

The African American Regional Educational Alliances™ (AAREA™) host “A Courageous Conversation about the Systematic Demise of Black Boys” at its 4th Annual Professional Development Breakfast in Oakland, with a panel of four experts in the field of African American male development. Outstanding educators working for educational equity for African American students will be honored with awards. Read more

Journal Articles and Research Papers

Davis, James Earl. “Early Schooling and Academic Achievement of African American Males,” Urban Education, Vol. 38 No. 5 (2003): 515-534. DOI: 10.1177/0042085903256220. Available from the CSU Professional Development Institute of Urban Education website: http://www.csuprofessionaldevelopment.com/images/pdfs/EarlySchoolingAndAcademicAchievementOfAfricanAmericanMales.pdf

Published research from a variety of sources grounds the article in the most useful and reliable data that substantiates the achievement gap between African American males and their school peers, as well as providing direction to addressing lagging educational achievement.

Cooper, Robert, and Will J. Jordan. “Cultural Issues in Comprehensive School Reform,” Urban Education, Vol. 38 No. 4, July 2003 380-397. DOI: 10.1177/0042085903254967. Available from the CSU Professional Development Institute of Urban Education website: http://www.csuprofessionaldevelopment.com/images/pdfs/CulturalIssuesInComprehensiveSchoolReform.pdf

This article’s primary interest is an exploration of the complexities of educational and social conditions encountered by African American males in public schools. It focuses on the ability and effectiveness of comprehensive school reform to overcome the barriers to learning that hinder the urban Black male student, such as concentrated poverty, drug use, and violence.

Wimberley, George L. “School Relationships Foster Success for African American Students,” ACT Policy Report, 2003. Available from the ACT website: http://www.act.org/research/policymakers/pdf/school_relation.pdf

This study uses data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study and reflects ACT’s interest in analyzing the critical issues affecting the preparation and diversity of the postsecondary applicant pool. It offers recommendations that policy makers, educators, and others can use to enhance the transition from high school to postsecondary education.

Milton Williams, Toni, Kim D. Pemberton, and Cherrel Miller Dyce. “Engagement without Judgment: Building Effective School, Family, and Community Partnerships for African American Learners: A Primer for Teachers and Administrators,” African American Learners Volume 1, Issue 2 (2012) Available from the ISAAC website at https://isaac.wayne.edu/research/journal/article.php?newsletter=133&article=1899

The authors make the case for teachers and administrators to understand how to build effective engagements with African American families and communities without prejudging the socio-cultural practices, mores, experiences, daily realities, and historical memory of this community.  They provide culturally sensitive, responsive, and community-appropriate strategies for teachers and administrators to more effectively engage African American families and communities for the betterment of African American learners.

Useful Websites

African American Parent Community Coalition for Educational Equity, Inc. (http://www.aapccee.org/home.htm)

This is a parent-driven and parent-led organization whose goal is to equip parents with the knowledge and skills to become proactive advocates of their children by ensuring their academic success, college preparation, quality teachers, equitable resources and graduation support with multiple options.

Black Organizations and Organizations Serving the Black Community (http://www.tnj.com/lists-resources/black-organizations-and-organizations-serving-black-communities)

The Network Journal lists resources of all kinds on this page: business groups, charities, museums, churches, professional organizations, and political groups.

League of Black Parents (http://blackstarproject.org/action/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=3&Itemid=12)

The Black Star Project’s League of Black Parents is based in Chicago but open to “parents, educators, clergy, community members’ and students of all races, ethnicities and faith backgrounds” in other cities as well. The basis of the League is the belief that Black parents are responsible for the well-being of Black children and must take action to guarantee them a successful education.

The History behind Black History Month (http://www.tolerance.org/article/history-behind-black-history-month)

This article on the Teaching Tolerance website introduces African American scholar Carter G. Woodson, the founder of Black History Month, which began as Negro History Week.

The College Bound Brotherhood (http://www.collegeboundbros.org/)

This website provides resources for African American males and their families, including a searchable directory available to youth, parents, and educators interested in locating college readiness programs for their young men in the Bay Area.

Choose College Educational Foundation® (http://www.choosecollege4life.com/)

This website provides college-going information and resources for educators, parents, and students. The foundation also provides special outreach and services to underrepresented populations and communities.

Black Star Project (http://blackstarproject.org/action/)

Founded in 1996 by Phillip Jackson, The Black Star Project is committed to improving the quality of life in Black and Latino communities of Chicago and nationwide by eliminating the racial academic achievement gap. The website provides important information on initiatives, programs, laws, and events affecting the Black community all over the United States. Learn what you can do to support the movement and make a difference.

The Black Family Network (http://www.blackfamilynet.net)

The Black Family Network promotes opportunities for the Black Community to take a leadership role in developing and teaching African American children and professionals about the work of technology. It focuses on closing the digital divide to make an impact in the future of Black families and communities. Register to post your own event.

National Center on African American Marriages and Parenting (http://www.hamptonu.edu/ncaamp/)

The National Center on African American Marriages and Parenting is committed to transforming marriages, empowering parents and strengthening families in African American and other communities. Visit the website to find information, resources and support on raising strong, healthy families.

Black History.com (http://www.blackhistory.com/)

This site is the largest online encyclopedia and social network dedicated to Black history and culture. Users can browse the collection of profiles of famous African Americans, read about events in history and significant places, or search the directory of organizations, as well as joining groups, reading blogs, and watching videos.